New FAA drone regulations

With the purpose of keeping the standard of having the safest and most complex airspace in the world, the Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration released in August a series of regulations for the lawful use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) or “drones”. This, according to the press release, opens a pathway towards a full integration of UAS into American air space.

“We are part of a new era in aviation, and the potential for unmanned aircraft will make it safer and easier to do certain jobs, gather information, and deploy disaster relief,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said.

This new rule specifies safety regulations for unmanned aircraft drones that weigh less than 55 pounds.  These safety regulations include the protection of the public and property on the ground.  This is why the regulations include that a drone operator must always be able to see their drone while it is in the air.

The new regulation also addresses heights and speed restrictions. It also intends to protect people who are not participating in drone activities. “With this new rule, we are taking a careful and deliberate approach that balances the need to deploy this new technology with the FAA’s mission to protect public safety,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. “But this is just our first step. We’re already working on additional rules that will expand the range of operations.”

The FAA has required permission to use the airspace to fly a drone. This means that a drone operator will need to have an FAA-approved remote pilot certificate before flying an UAS. 

There are several other regulations specifically for drones being used in American airspace.  To ensure the safety and integrity of the citizens, there will be sanctions for those who injure a third person with the drone. 

 

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